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a. Australian Native Wax Flowera. Australian Native Wax FlowerThe Wax Flowers with their white to pink and mauve, starry, 5 petalled flowers have long been favorites. Found mainly in the temperate parts of Australia, with 32 species with a number of sub-species they are an erect shrub growing to about 2 metres.
b. The Golden Pendab. The Golden PendaThe Golden Penda. The golden staments, after which the genus is named, are 2-3 cm long and most eye catching. In the garden this outstanding ornamental plant flowers when quite young and is one of the most showy rainforest plants.
bb. Frangipanibb. FrangipaniFrangipani - The frangipani grows widely around the warmer parts of Australia. It has beautiful flowers with a stunning perfume. This decorative tree, with its fragrant scented five petal flowers, conjures up the feel of the tropics, warm summer days and exotic island escapes
c. Australian Native Banksiac. Australian Native BanksiaAustralian Native Banksia.- Named after Sir Joseph Banks, the Banksia, with some 50 species is found mainly in Western Australia. It is one of Australia’s most fascinating plants and vary from prostate shrubs, in which the flower spike arises from the ground, to large growing trees. The flower spikes have approximately 1,000 quaint, individual flowers, arranged around a central axis to form a cylindrical spike.
d. Australian Native Bottlebrushd.  Australian Native BottlebrushAustralian Native Bottlebrush. The bottlebrush are possibly the best known and most widely cultivated of Australian shrubs. They consist of hardy, bushy shrubs and trees with tough leaves, often with papery bark and flowers produced in dense spikes at the ends of the branches. The stems are the most conspicuous part of the flower and are in colours of green, yellow, white, various shades of red and also violet.
e. The Rosee. The RoseThe Rose. The rose has captured humankind’s imagination for thousands of years, and has taken a place of honour in gardens around the world. Roses were first cultivated in the gardens of China, but their use was soon worldwide. The Roman and Greek cultures both placed religious, medical and mythical significance on what the poet Sappho called “the Queen of Flowers”.
f. Australian Wild Gum Blossomf. Australian Wild Gum BlossomAustralian Wild Gum Blossom. “Gum Tree” is the most common name for the 500 kinds of Australian Eucalyptus. They vary from forest giants to low straggling shrubs. First mentioned by Sir Joseph Banks in 1770, when he wrote of a tree having gum exudations, similar to an exotic plant he knew. The term “Gum Tree” is now usually reserved to those eucalyptus with smooth bark.
h. Australian Native Waratahh. Australian Native WaratahAustralian Native Waratah. The floral emblem of New South Wales is the Waratah. A striking plant when in flower, there are four kinds of waratah. These shrubs and trees have tough, dark green leaves, often toothed. The individual flowers grow on a dense head. Waratahs are most particular in their requirements and need a deep, sandy, well drained soil in a protected position, as they are very subject to root rot.
i. Australian Wild Flannel Floweri. Australian Wild Flannel FlowerAustralian Wild Flannel Flower. A favorite wildflower of New South Wales and Queensland the flannel flower is perfect for a rockery. When mass planted, the lovely, soft, silvery-grey foliage and the whitish, woolly, felt-like flowers in spring and summer add a marvelous contrast to any landscape. These plants are often considered challenging to cultivate, but a sandy, well-drained rockery in full sun should provide.
j. Australian Wild Gum Blossomj. Australian Wild Gum BlossomAustralian Wild Gum Blossom. “Gum Tree” is the most common name for the 500 kinds of Australian Eucalyptus. There are many common names and these usually arise from a common feature such as: type of timber, nature of bark, leaf aroma and habit of growth. The flowers have no petals, as they are formed into a cap which covers the stamens and falls off to allow the fluffy stamens to protrude.
k. Frangipanik. FrangipaniFrangipani. The frangipani grows widely around the warmer parts of Australia. It has beautiful flowers with a stunning perfume. This decorative tree, with its fragrant scented five petal flowers, conjures up the feel of the tropics, warm summer days and exotic island escapes. The frangipani originated in southern Mexico, central America and the Caribbean.
l. Australian Native Wattlel. Australian Native WattleAustralian Native Wattle.The wattles are possibly the best known amongst the Australian plants and one species, Acacia pycnantha, is regarded as the Australian floral emblem. With over 500 kinds of wattles, distributed throughout Australia, there is a wide range of shape, form and habit of growth, from low, spreading shrubs to large, upright growing trees. The attractive fluffy flowers are arranged in heads.
m. The Lily Pondm. The Lily PondLily Pond. The Australian water lily has small to large flat and round leaves, which float on the surface of the water. The flowers of white, pink, blue and red arise from beneath the water to flower. They grow with their roots in mud at the bottom of pools.
n. Australian Native Christmas Bellsn. Australian Native Christmas BellsAustralian Native Christmas Bells. From late December to February the moist, sunny heartland areas of the east coast of Australia are aided in their floral display by the formal, stiff stemmed Christmas Bells. Arising from a small clump of stiff, grass-like leaves, the flowers vary in colour from red and yellow to orange and yellow or yellow and grow at the end of a stiff flower stalk.
o. Roses - Lilaco. Roses - LilacRoses - White. “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose; By any other name would smell as sweet”-William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act 2 scene2. One of the most popular of flowering plants, there are both wild and cultivated species, grown throughout the world. Roses have a long and colourful history. According to fossil evidence, the rose is 35 million years old, with over 30,000 varieties of roses.
p.Grevillia - Pink Spiderp.Grevillia - Pink SpiderGrevillia - Pink Spider - The Spider Flowers are amongst Australia’s most attractive group of plants. With a wide diversity of form, shape and size, they vary from prostrate, ground hugging plants, through different shrub types, to large, upright growing trees. The foliage is fascinating in its diversity of shape from small and simple to large and deeply divided.
q. The Magnoliaq. The MagnoliaThe Magnolia - The usually large, solitary Magnolia flowers vary in shape from almost flat and saucer-like to a narrow goblet shape, and can be quite fragrant. The flowers are usually white, cream, yellow, or pink to purple shades. Flowering occurs mainly in spring, but the evergreen species can flower all through the warmer months. The fruits that follow the flowers are often pink or red, cone-like, showy clusters, with colourful seeds.
r.Kangaroo Pawr.Kangaroo PawKangaroo Paw. With strap-like leaves and unusual flowers, these attractive Western Australian plants are excellent for rockeries. Kangaroo Paws produce their velvety tubular flowers at the end of long, stiff stems and these come in a marvelous range of colours – green, green and red, various reds, yellow and orange. Containing copious quantities of nectar, the flowers attract honeyeaters.
s. Kangaroo Paws. Kangaroo PawKangaroo Paw. With strap-like leaves and unusual flowers, these attractive Western Australian plants are excellent for rockeries. Kangaroo Paws produce their velvety tubular flowers at the end of long, stiff stems and these come in a marvelous range of colours – green, green and red, various reds, yellow and orange.
t. Native Boroniat.  Native BoroniaBoronia. With their starry flowers, the boronia holds a strong appeal to those who like to grow wildflowers. They are chiefly small shrubs with strongly aromatic leaves which are entire or feathery. The 4 petalled flowers, with eight stamens, are produced in abundance in attractive shades from pale pink to red, brown and yellow and blue.
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